For Seahawks, life after Legion of Boom coming faster than we thought based on this NFL draft

The NFL drafts shows the Seahawks preparing for life after Boom. It’s not something that will likely show up in 2017, but in the harsh reality of the NFL, you have to perpetually gird yourself for ruthless turnover.

Two nicknames define what will one day be remembered as the glory days of the Seattle Seahawks: Beast Mode, and Legion of Boom.

The monikers themselves conjure up vivid images: Power. Intimidation. Quirkiness. Fun. Lombardi Trophy.

Last Wednesday, the Seahawks formally severed ties with Beast Mode when they traded Marshawn Lynch to the Raiders for a slightly better draft position next year. In reality, they’ve been struggling to replace Lynch’s productivity – not to mention his aura – since his retirement after the 2015 season.

And now, with their actions in the NFL draft that ended Saturday, you can see the Seahawks preparing for life after Boom. It’s not something that will likely manifest itself in 2017, but in the harsh reality of the NFL, you have to perpetually gird yourself for the ruthless turnover and inevitable diminution of career primes.

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After going several years blissfully free of the need to spend valuable draft capital on the secondary, the Seahawks dived headlong into the DB pool these past two days. On Friday, they selected Central Florida cornerback Shaquill Griffin (No. 90 overall) and Michigan safety Delano Hill (No. 95) with third-round selections.

And bright and early Saturday, with the fourth pick of the fourth round, they grabbed Colorado safety Tedric Thompson (No. 187). That’s on top of free agent safety Bradley McDougald, signed earlier this offseason to a one-year, $1.8 million deal by Seattle with $750,000 guaranteed – and the selection of another defensive back, the University of Cincinnati’s Mike Tyson, in the sixth round Saturday. He was a safety in college but said the Seahawks told him he would compete at cornerback.

It smells vaguely like a changing of the guard … or at least the first steps toward one. Not since the 2010 draft, when Seattle chose Earl Thomas in the first round and Walter Thurmond in the fourth, had the Seahawks used a pick in the fourth round or higher for a defensive back. There has been little need to do anything but dabble in a sixth-rounder here (Eric Pinkins in 2014) or a seventh-rounder there (Ryan Murphy in 2015).

John Schneider said Saturday this was merely the way the draft fell – it was laden with talented defensive backs, and “we followed our board,” he said. “That’s just the way the board came off. We didn’t want to start just jumping players. That’s when you get in trouble.”

Yet with all these new defensive backs, the possibility for developing the successors to the magnificent no-longer-baby Boomers is enhanced, if not encouraged.

Thomas has been the heart and soul of the Legion of Boom, along with Kam Chancellor (fifth round in…

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