“Mom’s dead.”

Jonathan Russo still struggles to repeat those words 12 years after telling his younger brother that their mother, Concetta Russo-Carriero, was stabbed to death in a White Plains parking garage.

A homeless convicted rapist stole a knife from the Galleria mall and killed the 56-year-old legal secretary on June 29, 2005.

Sitting in his Mahopac home recently, Russo, now 40, described a family shattered by the murder of its matriarch.

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“She was such a strong and important figure in our lives, and it was so unimaginable to just lose her,” he said. “This is 12 years later and we’re still picking up the pieces from it; it’s something you don’t quite get over.”

Russo also spoke about why the family supports New York’s civil commitment law, named “Connie’s Law” after his mother, that allows for locking up sex offenders after they finish criminal sentences.

“We wanted positive change and we did not want to see another family go through what we went through,” he said.

Addressing civil rights and cost concerns since the sex offender law’s enactment in 2007, Russo pointed to his family’s focus on public safety.

“I’m all for making changes to the law as long as we don’t lose sight of the fact that there are convicted sex offenders that have served their time that will commit crime…